Category Archives: Art

Help! I Can’t Stop!

I thought this would be just another morning at home.  Then I stumbled upon the song Guantanamera done on YouTube as part of the Playing For Change project.  That led to watching and listening to La Bamba, What’s Going On, Stand Up Sit Up . . .   Lots of great songs.  Watching the videos caused goose bumps – they are that good.  Fun.  Uplifting.  Especially the out-of-this world rendition of Lean On Me.  What a show!  What a show!

Help, I can’t stop.  I’m going to be here all day listening to music. Oh god!  Now it’s What a Wonderful World!

Each video has many different musicians and groups that contribute to the songs.  They play in locations around the world on every continent.  Somehow, all the clips of all the different musicians and all the different locales are combined into wonderful creations.  They musicians are the best.  The videos are the best.  The music is the best.

Playing For Change has a motto:  Connecting the World Through Music.

Mark Johnson, the co-founder, says

The idea is to show people enough different cultures using music to uplift themselves, so that we can see the connections we all have.

Keith Richards

. . . that’s the way music was meant to be.

Grandpa Elliot

. . . man, all my life I’ve been putting out love, but not like that

Far from being just another morning, it’s been an inspiring, fun, music-filled morning.  I feel like it’s a bright, sunshiny day even though it’s wet and cloudy.

Peace Through Music

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Punk in 1970s New York

city-on-fireI’ve recently read or watched two items that involve the punk scene (or should I say punk-rock scene?  I’m not sure.) in New York City in the mid-1970s:  The book City On Fire by Garth Risk Hallberg and Spike Lee’s movie Summer Of Sam.

City On Fire is a long book, almost 1000 dense pages.  The nexus of the plot is the murder of a young woman in a New York park on New Year’s Eve 1977.  The book describes in great detail the lives and relationships of the people who were involved in one way or another with the murdered woman.  It jumps back and forth in time from the early sixties to the start of the 21st Century while also jumping back and forth between characters.  Many of the characters are punks participating in the New York City scene that apparently started in the mid-1970s.  I cannot speak from experience about any aspect of punk.  During that time period I was moving in the opposite direction; exploring bluegrass, country, and mountain music.  So while the punks in this novel were moving away from the musical (pop) mainstream and finding punk, I was moving away from the mainstream and finding bluegrass.  Given what I learned from the book and movie, I’m glad I moved in that direction.

City On Fire also covers the massive and  complete blackout in New York City in the summer of 1977.  Some of the book’s climactic events happen during the night of the blackout.

summer-of-samThe movie Summer of Sam uses the background of the Son Of Sam serial killings to depict life in New York when David Berkowitz was on his killing spree.  It focuses on the punk scene and on life in the city’s Italian neighborhoods.  City On Fire presents more of a political and artistic picture of punk as a search for a sort of anarchistic freedom.  Summer Of Sam, in contrast, focuses a lot on the sexual goings-on within the punk and club scenes.

I’m not sure I would recommend watching the movie or reading the book.  I was often irritated at the book’s author for jumping around so much.  I kept wanting him to stick to the plot line in which I was engrossed.   Eventually, I just wanted him to wrap things up and tell me what happened to all the characters whom except, I think, for one, were strung out on drugs or alcohol.  They were all drinking excessively, strung out, shooting heroin, dropping pills, sometimes doing it all in one day.  I did not think it was possible for a person to use as many drugs and as much alcohol as some of the characters.

Watching the movie left me feeling like I had besmirched my soul.

eye-and-tear

 

 

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Filed under Art, Books, Culture, History, History, Movies, Music, Music, Novels

Good Graffitti

I went for a walk the other day and stumbled (not literally) upon some good graffiti.  I laughed out loud.

The chalk artists are a mother and daughter.  I think they had a good time with their chalk.  They have a Facebook page titled You Matter.

Here are more of their chalkings.

 

 

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McSorley’s Bar

Last week’s photo challenge from The Daily Post:

This week, find inspiration in a piece of art. Then, imitate it.

I chose to try to imitate John Sloan’s painting McSorley’s Bar:

McSorley's Bar Imitation

McSorley’s Bar Imitation

Mcsorley's Bar

Mcsorley’s Bar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Sloan was a painter in the Ashcan School,

an artistic movement in the United States during the early twentieth century that is best known for works portraying scenes of daily life in New York, often in the city’s poorer neighborhoods.

Their unity [of the artists in the school] consisted of a desire to tell certain truths about the city and modern life they felt had been ignored by the suffocating influence of the Genteel Tradition in the visual arts. Robert Henri, in some ways the spiritual father of this school, “wanted art to be akin to journalism… he wanted paint to be as real as mud, as the clods of horse-shit and snow, that froze on Broadway in the winter.” He urged his younger friends and students to paint in the robust, unfettered, ungenteel spirit of his favorite poet, Walt Whitman, and to be unafraid of offending contemporary taste. He believed that working-class and middle-class urban settings would provide better material for modern painters than drawing rooms and salons.

 

 

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Filed under Art, Photo Challenge, Photos, The Daily Post